WSJ Critiques Financial Regulatory Improvement Act

Last week Wednesday, this blog reported on Sen. Shelby’s discussion draft of The Financial Regulatory Improvement Act of 2015. For those of you who are inclined to delve a little deeper into these things, and who haven’t already done so, you may be interested in the Wall Street Journal’s critique of the draft. The upshot is, the particular way the bill proposes to loosen the requirements around qualified mortgages may, in fact, put banks in a worse position than they were before the 2008 collapse — and no one wants to see that again. Well worth the read if you have an opinion on banks’ ability to self-assess their risks.

Stop! Think! Before You Prepay Your Mortgage…

Conventional wisdom is that you should pre-pay your mortgage — at the very least, you should break your monthly payment in half and pay it twice per month. Doing so can dramatically shorten the period of your loan and save you a bunch of money in the long haul. But as with all things, conventional wisdom isn’t necessarily the right answer. Liz Weston writes for CBS MoneyWatch, and addresses four reasons you very well may be better off doing something with that money other than pre-paying your mortgage. Plus, she uncovers some pre-payment scams you should avoid.

Student Loans Not Stopping Millennials from Buying Homes

There has been a lot of talk around the differences in buying patterns for Millennials — everything from not owning televisions, to living (much) longer with their parents, to not buying homes even when they do move out of the basement. Particularly over the last decade, the rabid increase in student-loan debt has been used as a partial explanation for these differences. However, it looks like that isn’t true. CNBC reports on a study by TransUnion which seems to show that, while Millennial buying patterns may differ from those of previous generations, it does not appear that student-loan debt has any impact on home buying.